Regarding Al Franken: I have to respectfully disagree. The picture itself was enough to make me want to see Franken go. True, there was no investigation into the other claims, but I did not think one was necessary — Franken’s attitude was apparently a matter of public record https://www.newsweek.com/franken-jokes-sexual-misconduct-women-713678. Actions aside, evidence of attitude alone makes me want a better public official. As for where the bar is for conduct that “costs someone their career” — why is only the man’s career considered here? What about the careers of countless women that depended upon their submitting to harassment and keeping quiet about it? How many women’s careers have been trashed without “due process” and “investigation” — without ever making the news? Anita Hill is still suffering from what Clarence Thomas and Joe Biden did to her decades ago, yet we continue to ask ourselves “should what someone (a man) did 20 years ago cost him NOW?” I think the women whose careers a man ruined 20 years ago may have an opinion about that. What we are undertaking now is a reckoning. This doesn’t mean that any accusation should automatically fly. But it does mean women should not be the only ones to bear the burden of crimes that are hard to prove. How many women should suffer from rape, sexual assault, and harassment to prevent any man from having to worry about a false accusation? Justice can never be perfect when it comes to deeds done in the dark. But the assumption that this is exclusively women’s problem — that a thousand unpunished rapes of women is better that a single man’s potential for a false accusation, is what I want to see challenged. For me, this is what #TimesUp is all about.

Beverly is an author, artist, and a practicing agnostic.

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